movies

Favorite Articles of 2019

2019 is almost in the books, so here’s a collection of my favorite articles I worked on this past year:

https://collider.com/unbreakable-superhero-movies/

https://collider.com/why-coen-brothers-the-ladykillers-is-bad/

https://collider.com/what-was-game-of-thrones-about/

https://collider.com/how-john-wick-3-is-like-detective-pikachu/

https://collider.com/how-to-be-a-better-movie-fan/

https://collider.com/forrest-gump-problems/

https://collider.com/what-is-fight-club-really-about-explained/

https://collider.com/marvel-vs-directors-explained/

https://collider.com/the-future-of-star-wars-is-bleak/

https://collider.com/how-to-live-like-hobbs-and-shaw-video/

https://collider.com/brad-pitt-interview-ad-astra-world-war-z-2-fight-club/

https://collider.com/top-100-best-essential-movies/

Tuesday, December 31st, 2019 movies, personal, television No Comments

‘Robin Hood’ Review: A Fascinating Misfire That’s Still a Lot of Fun

So I’m posting this on my personal blog because there’s no outlet right now that’s saying, “Please, tell us about 2018’s Robin Hood.” Even in 2018, no one was like “Please tell us about 2018’s Robin Hood,” which is probably why the movie made less than $100 million worldwide even though it cost $100 million to make (to the director’s credit, the film does look expensive with its big practical sets). Even Summit, the studio behind the film, didn’t seem to care that much as they didn’t bother to screen it for critics, which is why I’m just seeing the movie now.

And it’s kind of…good? It reminds me of another much-maligned public domain action movie, King Arthur: Legend of the Sword. Both were intended to be the start of cinematic universes until that idea fizzled and they just became very stylish retellings that attempt to make the medieval setting seem cool. For King Arthur, it dives into the fantasy weirdness, but Robin Hood is a different animal.

The concept behind Robin Hood seems to be “make it modern but also make it medieval.” And director Otto Bathurst took that mandate literally. The mashup doesn’t really work because the medieval stuff hangs like an albatross around the picture that seems like it would be more comfortable in the present day. So instead of making Robin Hood a rich kid who goes to the Iraq War, witnesses injustices, and becomes like a hacker or something to steal from the rich, he’s still an archer and he has to contend with enemies who have bazookas but the bazookas are filled with arrows. He has to take out a machine gunner but instead of firing bullets, it fires arrows. It’s so weird.

And yet I’d rather see a movie that takes big, weird swings than something rote and predictable (thankfully, we have 2010’s Robin Hood as a basis for comparison). But every creative choice in Robin Hood strains against something conventional. The film wants to get into interesting issues of wealth and war, but also Robin of Loxley has to do a Bruce Wayne/Batman thing. The film wants to talk about wealth distribution, but there needs to be a heist element. And it’s not like Robin Hood is opposed to these choices, but they feel conventional in a film that through its attitude and visuals looks like it wants to be different.

Despite this ambivalence, the movie still manages to be a lot of fun. No one seems like they’re phoning it in, which I’m sure may have been tempting at the prospect of a blockbuster Robin Hood movie that wants to play like Batman. Taron Egerton is particularly game (he’s a very charming actor) and Ben Mendelsohn treats the villainy with the same glee and devotion as he did in Rogue One. There are also some scenes that are genuinely great like when the Sheriff of Nottingham psychologically torments John during an interrogation.

I also like that the script is unafraid to make changes to the myth (another similarity to King Arthur). They drop characters who aren’t necessary (like King John) and make big changes to others like having Marian and Little John be activists. And Bathurst is bold enough to channel the imagery of war and rebellion to his purposes without it feeling cynical or exploitative.

If you passed on Robin Hood because you thought it looked dumb, I strongly encourage you to give it a shot. It’s far from a perfect movie, but it’s consistently interesting, entertaining, and a different take on well-worn material.

Rating: B

Wednesday, December 11th, 2019 criticism, movies No Comments

2019 Oscar Predictions

Best Picture

Will Win: Roma

Should Win: The Favourite

Best Director

Will Win: Alfonso Cuaron, Roma

Should Win: Alfonso Cuaron, Roma

Best Actor

Will Win: Rami Malek, Bohemian Rhapsody

Should Win: Christian Bale, Vice

Best Actress

Will Win: Glenn Close, The Wife

Should Win: Olivia Colman, The Favourite

Best Supporting Actor

Will Win: Mahershala Ali, Green Book

Should Win: Sam Elliott, A Star Is Born

Best Supporting Actress

Will Win: Regina King, If Beale Street Could Talk

Should Win: Regina King, If Beale Street Could Talk

Best Adapted Screenplay

Will Win: BlacKkKlansman

Should Win: BlacKkKlansman

Best Original Screenplay

Will Win: First Reformed

Should Win: First Reformed

Best Cinematography

Will Win: Roma

Should Win: Roma

Best Costumes Design

Will Win: Black Panther

Should Win: Black Panther

Best Editing

Will Win: Vice

Should Win: The Favourite

Best Makeup & Hairstyling

Will Win: Vice

Should Win: Vice

Best Score

Will Win: BlacKkKlansman

Should Win: If Beale Street Could Talk

Best Original Song

Will Win: “Shallow”, A Star Is Born

Should Win: “Shallow”, A Star Is Born

Best Production Design

Will Win: Black Panther

Should Win: Black Panther

Best Sound Editing

Will Win: Bohemian Rhapsody

Should Win: A Quiet Place

Best Sound Mixing

Will Win: Bohemian Rhapsody

Should Win: Roma

Best Visual Effects

Will Win: First Man

Should Win: First Man

Best Animated Film

Will Win: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Should Win: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Best Foreign Language Film

Will Win: Roma

Should Win: Roma

Best Documentary

Will Win: RBG

Should Win: Minding the Gap

Best Documentary Short

Will Win: Black Sheep

Best Animated Short

Will Win: Bao

Best Live-Action Short

Will Win: Marguerite

Friday, February 22nd, 2019 movies No Comments

My Best Features of 2018

I’m trying to learn how to push my own work, so apologies if this comes off as arrogant or self-centered. These were the articles I was most proud of in 2018:

In Defense of Physical Media: Why You Should Keep Buying Blu-rays and DVDs

Annihilation Explained: Unpacking Alex Garland’s Brilliant, Trippy Sci-Fi Horror Film

Good Movies Are Overrated

Love, Simon and the Necessary Death of the “Nice Guy”

‘God of War’ and Why Fans Don’t Always Know What’s Best

Why ‘Westworld’ Doesn’t Earn Its Cynical View of Humanity

‘The Fugitive’ at 25: Hollywood Doesn’t Make This Kind of Movie Anymore, and That’s a Shame

The Differences between the Four Versions of ‘A Star Is Born’, Explained

Netflix Should Push Kathryn Hahn for a Best Actress Oscar Nomination for ‘Private Life’

No, You Don’t “Need” to See ‘ROMA’ in a Theater

‘Green Book’ and the Importance of Feeling Bad

‘Green Book’, ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’, and Why It’s Important Who Tells Your Story

How ‘Mary Poppins Returns’ Misses the Spirit of the Original

The Mid-Credits Scene of ‘Vice’ Is the Film’s Raison D’être

 

Monday, December 31st, 2018 criticism, movies, television No Comments

‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ Review: We Will Rock You (in a Safe, Sanitized Fashion)

For a movie that holds up Queen as innovators, Bohemian Rhapsody is remarkably generic and predictable. At one point in the movie, Queen, rebels that they are, are arguing with Ray Foster (Mike Myers, who keeps lapsing into his Fat Bastard voice), the head of EMI, over the release of “Bohemian Rhapsody”. As Queen celebrates their own masterpiece and touts the song as breaking the mold, Foster fires back, “I love formulas!” And the movie, which is credited to director Bryan Singer, but was finished by Dexter Fletcher after Singer was fired for disappearing from the set, is more than happy to abide by formulas. You won’t walk out of Bohemian Rhapsody with a greater understanding of Freddie Mercury (Rami Malek) or the artistry of Queen’s music. But Queen members Brian May (Gwilym Lee) and Roger Taylor (Ben Hardy), who served as producers on the film, get to craft their own mythology with Bohemian Rhapsody. They want you to know that they’re legends; they just never bother to explain how or why.

The film plays by the standard biopic rules, starting back at the formation of Queen in 1970 and tracking them through the ups and downs of their career with Mercury serving as the protagonist. It’s a film that understands that Mercury has to be front and center, just as he was with the band, but that May, Taylor, and bassist John Deacon (Joseph Mazzello) were also part of Queen and contributed to the band’s success. However, as Queen tries to navigate stardom, Freddie begins to fray, especially with the negative influence of Paul Prenter (Allen Leech). Thankfully, since this is a traditional rock band biopic that never takes any unexpected twists or turns, redemption is only a reunion and a concert away.

Bohemain Rhapsody always feels like a fan film made by Queen. It comes off as by the band, for the band, and that encases everything in a protective glass shell that ultimately weakens the picture. At best, you come away with a reminder of the Queen songs you enjoy, and maybe you’ll be tempted to buy the Greatest Hits album if you don’t own it already. But it’s a film that’s always comes off as being crafted from the outside, the kind of picture you would make after reading Queen’s Wikipedia page. That’s not going to help you understand their artistry or what made them unique or why Queen endures while other rock bands from the era have faded away. Bohemian Rhapsody is two hours of Queen appreciation, which means there’s really no room for nuance or anything remotely dangerous.

Where the film starts to get insulting is how it treats Mercury’s homosexuality. The film pulls as far away as possible from Mercury’s homosexuality while still acknowledging that he’s gay. His closest relationship is with his wife Mary Austin (Lucy Boynton) and he constantly professes her love for her even though there’s no specificity to their relationship and Malek and Boynton have no chemistry. The primary negative relationship in Mercury’s life is Prenter, and homosexuality, as it’s depicted in Bohemian Rhapsody, is a destructive force full of empty relationships, meaningless sex, and coarse manipulation. The film tries to tack on a positive gay relationship at the end, but it rings hollow because again, there’s no specificity to it.

For some, the film may succeed due to Malek’s performance, but while I’ll agree that Malek is a talented performer, he doesn’t seem to have a unique angle on Mercury, which isn’t really his fault because the script never gives him one. He’s got a strained relationship with his father, but that never becomes a thing. Freddie is depicted as being lonely, but the movie never builds on it. Because the driving force of Bohemian Rhapsody is “Queen is legendary”, there’s no room for anything authentic or uncomfortable. There are only the ebbs and flows that the genre demands, and no one involved in the filmmaking process made a point to question those genre tropes. That leaves an actor like Malek with not much to do except sing Mercury’s songs and rely heavily on giant fake teeth to complete the impression.

I’m sure Bohemian Rhapsody will win over some Queen fans, but that’s a trick. Liking Bohemian Rhapsody because you’re a Queen fan is akin to liking Batman & Robin because you’re a Batman fan. It’s possible to tell the story of Queen and do it justice, but no one seemed interested in telling that story. They wanted something pre-packaged, easily digestible, and laudatory. But great art isn’t supposed to be comforting, and Queen didn’t make waves by being a safe, predictable band. By unquestioningly celebrating Queen, Bohemian Rhapsody does both the band and Mercury a great disservice.

Rating: D+

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018 movies No Comments

2018 Oscar Predictions

Best Picture

Will Win: The Shape of Water

Should Win: Get Out

Best Director

Will Win: Guillermo del Toro, The Shape of Water

Should Win: Guillermo del Toro, The Shape of Water

Best Actor

Will Win: Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour

Should Win: Timothee Chalamet, Call Me by Your Name

Best Actress

Will Win: Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Should Win: Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best Supporting Actor

Will Win: Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Should Win: Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project

Best Supporting Actress

Will Win: Allison Janney, I, Tonya

Should Win: Allison Janney, I, Tonya

Best Adapted Screenplay

Will Win: Call Me by Your Name

Should Win: Mudbound

Best Original Screenplay

Will Win: Get Out

Should Win: Get Out

Best Cinematography

Will Win: Blade Runner 2049

Should Win: Blade Runner 2049

Best Costumes Design

Will Win: Phantom Thread

Should Win: Phantom Thread

Best Editing

Will Win: Baby Driver

Should Win: Baby Driver

Best Makeup & Hairstyling

Will Win: Darkest Hour

Should Win: Darkest Hour

Best Score

Will Win: The Shape of Water

Should Win: Phantom Thread

Best Original Song

Will Win: “This Is Me”, The Greatest Showman

Should Win: “Remember Me”, Coco

Best Production Design

Will Win: Blade Runner 2049

Should Win: The Shape of Water

Best Sound Editing

Will Win: Dunkirk

Should Win: Baby Driver

Best Sound Mixing

Will Win: Baby Driver

Should Win: Baby Driver

Best Visual Effects

Will Win: Blade Runner 2049

Should Win: War for the Planet of the Apes

Best Animated Film

Will Win: Coco

Should Win: Coco

Best Foreign Language Film

Will Win: A Fantastic Woman

Best Documentary

Will Win: Icarus

Best Documentary Short

Will Win: Heroin(e)

Best Animated Short

Will Win: Dear Basketball

Best Live-Action Short

Will Win: DeKalb Elementary

Thursday, March 1st, 2018 movies No Comments

‘The Mummy’ Review: A Wretched Abomination

The Mummy marks the beginning of Universal’s Dark Universe, the brand under which the studio’s cinematic universe of classic monsters interconnects.  While cinematic universes became all the rage thanks to Marvel, Universal Monsters have crossed over decades ago.  The question with Universal Monsters wasn’t “Could they cross over?” but rather “What tone would they take?”  The original Universal Monster movies run the gamut from darkly comic (The Invisible Man) to tragedy (Frankenstein), sometimes within the span of the same movie (The Bride of Frankenstein).

For producer and The Mummy director Alex Kurtzman, his solution is to try and create an action-horror hybrid, a movie that can give action-packed scenes like Tom Cruise plummeting to Earth in a cargo plane, but can also be suitably creepy.  Unfortunately, The Mummy is left hanging somewhere in the middle, not thrilling enough to be an action-packed ride like the surprisingly enjoyable 1999 movie, nor is it scary enough to stand alongside serviceable PG-13 horror films like Cloverfield or Drag Me to Hell.  What should be the dawn of a new age of “gods and monsters” instead appears to be at a loss with how it should even begin.

The story follows Nick Morton (Cruise), a reconnaissance officer in the U.S. military who spends his time stealing antiquities in Iraq to sell on the black market.  When he and his friend Chris Vail (Jake Johnson) come across a tomb thanks to research stolen from archeologist Jenny Halsey (Annabelle Wallis), they discover a sarcophagus belonging to Princess Ahmanet (Sofia Boutella), an ancient Egyptian who made a pact with Set, the God of Death, to rule Egypt.  However, the ritual to summon Set was interrupted, Ahmanet was mummified alive, and now she’s very angry.  When Nick carelessly raises her sarcophagus, he becomes “chosen” by her to be the new vessel for Set, so ends up scrambling across London with Jenny to avoid a wrathful Ahmanet.

If you look closely at The Mummy, there are some interesting things it’s trying to do.  Previous versions (the 1932 original and the 1999 remake) made the mummy, Imhotep, focus on his desire to reunite with his lost love, and, wouldn’t you know it, the female lead happens to remind him of that love, so he’s after the woman, and it’s up to the male hero to stop him.  Kurtzman’s Mummy tries to turn that on its head by trying to make the male lead the damsel in distress.  Moreover, it’s not that Nick reminds Ahmanet of her lost love as much as he’s a useful body so she can summon Set.  It’s a fun way to deconstruct the male hero, and one that Cruise is game for as he muddles his way through while Jenny provides all the knowledge.

Unfortunately, this approach is severely undermined by how Ahmanet is portrayed.  Her sexuality is turned not only into a key part of her character, but it’s literally weaponized.  Throughout the movie, she turns men into mummies by making out with them (if this sounds familiar, it’s because Enchantress also turned men into monsters by making out with them in last year’s Suicide Squad).   When it’s time to turn Nick into Set, she straddles him sexually, and while Kurtzman’s intent may have been to give Ahmanet the power in the scene, it shows that her power is mainly manifested in sexual ways.  Thus, the woman’s sexuality is both exploited and held up as a threat.

But even if the movie had somehow nailed the gender dynamic, it would struggle with the fact that it’s not a particularly interesting story and the lead characters lack arcs.  I’m a little shocked that Kurtzman, who’s not exactly new at screenwriting, can’t seem to grasp basic character development.  There’s not much reason to care about Nick and Jenny, and there’s very little reason to invest in their relationship.  The movie tries to coast on Cruise’s charisma, but even he seems at a loss as to why he’s there.  Nick isn’t an interesting guy, and his “arc” (if you could generously call it that), seems to be “He’s a bit of a selfish guy but then he ultimately does a selfless thing for a woman he doesn’t really know too well.”

The Mummy seems so eager to get to the action scenes and building up its own little universe that it skips the important stuff like “Make sure the audience is invested in the characters,” and “Make sure the story makes sense.”  I know that a Creature from the Black Lagoon movie is in the pipeline because I saw the creature’s severed hand in a glass jar when Nick walks through the lab of Prodigium, the super secret organization run by Dr. Henry Jekyll (Russell Crowe).  What I don’t know is why a super secret organization would be run by a guy like Jekyll who needs a complex series of injections every few hours or else he turns into a cockney rage monster.

Of course, the reason is because The Mummy is more concerned with setting up the pieces of future Dark Universe movies rather than telling individual stories.  But if The Mummy is any indication of what’s to come with Dark Universe, then these aren’t movies worth making.  What The Mummy signals is that Dark Universe will pile on loads of crummy CGI and awful storytelling that’s a waste of the time and talent of A-list actors like Cruise.  Kurtzman isn’t just some hired gun on board for this one movie.  He, along with Chris Morgan (Fast & Furious), has been the guiding force of Dark Universe, and he thinks The Mummy is a fine start to this cinematic universe.  It’s not.  It’s an abomination.

Rating: D-

Wednesday, June 7th, 2017 movies No Comments

2017 Oscar Predictions

Best Picture

Will Win: La La Land

Should Win: Moonlight

Best Director

Will Win: Damien Chazelle, La La Land

Should Win: Barry Jenkins, Moonlight

Best Actor

Will Win: Denzel Washington, Fences

Should Win: Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea

Best Actress

Will Win: Emma Stone, La La Land

Should Win: Emma Stone, La La Land

Best Supporting Actor

Will Win: Mahershala Ali, Moonlight

Should Win: Michael Shannon, Nocturnal Animals

Best Supporting Actress

Will Win: Viola Davis, Fences

Should Win: Viola Davis, Fences

Best Animated Feature

Will Win: Zootopia

Should Win: Zootopia

Best Original Screenplay

Will Win: Manchester by the Sea

Should Win: Manchester by the Sea

Best Adapted Screenplay

Will Win: Moonlight

Should Win: Moonlight

Best Documentary Feature

Will Win: O.J. Made in America

Should Win: 13th

Best Foreign Language Film

Will Win: The Salesman

Best Cinematography

Will Win: La La Land

Should Win: Moonlight

Best Costume Design

Will Win: Jackie

Should Win: Jackie

Best Film Editing

Will Win: La La Land

Should Win: Arrival

Best Makeup and Hairstyling

Will Win: Star Trek Beyond

Should Win: Star Trek Beyond

Best Music

Will Win: La La Land

Should Win: La La Land

Best Original Song

Will Win: “City of Stars” from La La Land

Should Win: “Audition” from La La Land

Best Production Design

Will Win: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Should Win: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Best Sound Editing

Will Win: Hacksaw Ridge

Should Win: Arrival

Best Sound Mixing

Will Win: La La Land

Should Win: Arrival

Best Visual Effects

Will Win: The Jungle Book

Should Win: The Jungle Book

Best Animated Short

Will Win: Pearl

Best Short Film

Will Win: Ennemis Intérieurs

Best Documentary Short Subject

Will Win: Joe’s Violin

Friday, February 24th, 2017 movies No Comments

2016 Oscar Predictions

Best Picture

Will Win: Spotlight

Should Win: Spotlight

Best Director

Will Win: Alejandro G. Iñárritu, The Revenant

Should Win: George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road

Best Actor

Will Win: Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant

Should Win: Michael Fassbender, Steve Jobs

Best Actress

Will Win: Brie Larson, Room

Should Win: Charolette Rampling, 45 Years

Best Supporting Actor

Will Win: Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Should Win: Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Best Supporting Actress

Will Win: Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl

Should Win: Rooney Mara, Carol

Best Animated Feature

Will Win: Inside Out

Should Win: Anomalisa

Best Original Screenplay

Will Win: Spotlight

Should Win: Spotlight

Best Adapted Screenplay

Will Win: The Big Short

Should Win: The Big Short

Best Documentary Feature

Will Win: Amy

Should Win: The Look of Silence

Best Foreign Language Film

Will Win: Son of Saul

Best Cinematography

Will Win: The Revenant

Should Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Best Costume Design

Will Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Should Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Best Film Editing

Will Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Should Win: The Big Short

Best Makeup and Hairstyling

Will Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Should Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Best Music

Will Win: The Hateful Eight

Should Win: The Hateful Eight

Best Original Song

Will Win: The Hunting Ground

Best Production Design

Will Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Should Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Best Sound Editing

Will Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Should Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Best Sound Mixing

Will Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Should Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Best Visual Effects

Will Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Should Win: Mad Max: Fury Road

Best Animated Short

Will Win: Sanjay’s Super Team

Should Win: World of Tomorrow

Best Short Film

Will Win: Stutterer

Best Documentary Short Subject

Will Win: Body Team 12

Sunday, February 28th, 2016 movies No Comments

2015 Oscar Predictions

For the record, here are my predictions for the 87th Academy Awards:

Best Picture

Will Win: Birdman

Should Win: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Best Director

Will Win: Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Birdman

Should Win: Richard Linklater, Boyhood

Best Actor

Will Win: Eddie Redmayne, The Theory of Everything

Should Win: Steve Carell, Foxcatcher

Best Actress

Will Win: Julianne Moore, Still Alice

Should Win: Julianne Moore, Still Alice

Best Supporting Actor

Will Win: J.K. Simmons, Whiplash

Should Win: J.K. Simmons, Whiplash

Best Supporting Actress

Will Win: Patricia Arquette, Boyhood

Should Win: Patricia Arquette, Boyhood

Best Animated Feature

Will Win: How to Train Your Dragon 2

Should Win: The Boxtrolls

Best Original Screenplay

Will Win: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Should Win: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Best Adapted Screenplay

Will Win: The Imitation Game

Should Win: Inherent Vice

Best Documentary Feature

Will Win: CitizenFour

Best Foreign Language Film

Will Win: Ida

Best Cinematography

Will Win: Birdman

Should Win: Ida

Best Costume Design

Will Win: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Should Win: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Best Film Editing

Will Win: Boyhood

Should Win: Boyhood

Best Makeup and Hairstyling

Will Win: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Should Win: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Best Music

Will Win: The Theory of Everything

Should Win: The Imitation Game

Best Original Song

Will Win: Selma

Should Win: The LEGO Movie

Best Production Design

Will Win: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Should Win: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Best Sound Editing

Will Win: American Sniper

Should Win: Interstellar

Best Sound Mixing

Will Win: Whiplash

Should Win: Whiplash

Best Visual Effects

Will Win: Interstellar

Should Win: Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Best Animated Short

Will Win: Feast

Should Win: Feast

Best Short Film

Will Win: The Phone Call

Best Documentary Short Subject

Will Win: Crisis Hotline: Veterans Press 1

Sunday, February 22nd, 2015 movies No Comments
 

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